Posted on Leave a comment

Innovative Collaboration: The Cutting Edge of Medicine Goes “Behind The Scenes”

LOS ANGELES (PRWEB) DECEMBER 11, 2019

Circularity is partnering with Telly Award-Winning “Behind the Scenes” to provide regular, ongoing, high-quality content from leading experts in a variety of fields with an initial focus on microcirculation science, regenerative medicine, and advanced wound healing and related symptoms. The show reaches 60 million households domestically.

“Behind The Scenes with Host Laurence Fishburne” is a public television icon that has won numerous awards and delivers precision idea-telling at its best. Circularity is an innovative healthcare organization that is health-bent on their trademarked slogan: “Improving Lives by Improving Blood Flow.” Their coming together to bring forward the ideas of modern health science on a stellar entertainment platform can only make for riveting content going forward. Viewers will find themselves in a win-win situation.

Watching informative content via this stylized venue will leave viewers feeling quite satisfied with their television watching experience. It is time well spent and information precisely delivered.

A Little More About Circularity

Circularity is concerned with bringing the very best in healthcare innovation to the public. In so doing, they have manufactured a product called D’OXYVA. This product has a two-pronged approach to health. First, it can be quite effective in reducing the debilitative effects of many of the diseases that are affecting the world today, such as COPD, diabetes, and cardiovascular illnesses. Secondly, Circularity’s D’OXYVA can be used in a preventative capacity to improve microcirculation. The concept of microcirculation has far-reaching implications in neurology, oncology, endocrinology, cardiovascular health, respiratory health, dermatology, diabetic wound healing or diabetic wound care and other major fields.

Circularity Healthcare, LLC is the power behind D’OXYVA. This noninvasive trans-dermal and circulatory health technology is just the first product to be offered. Circularity is invested in revolutionizing the healthcare space. They plan to do this by creating cutting edge medical products and procedures that are both patient and physician friendly while being effective in minimizing and eradicating diseases.

What “Behind The Scenes with Host Laurence Fishburne” Will Bring to the Table

Behind The Scenes has been an innovator in bringing information to the forefront in the public television space. The award-winning series features segments on the newest technologies, as well as fresh takes on existing entities, phenomenon, and natural occurrences. The show’s website boasts that the television series “highlights the evolution of education, medicine, science, technology and industry through inspiring stories.”

Aside from the Emmy-winning and Academy Award nominated actor Lawrence Fishburne as host, the program has an award-winning creative development team. Viewers walk away with a rich knowledge of the subject. Viewers may have known about this subject their whole lives, or it may be about something completely new. Viewers learn an evolving aspect of the topic which keeps the perspective fresh.

The dawning of a new age has appeared with this collaboration. Individuals who want to know more about what the health science field is bringing into our hospitals and doctors’ offices will not be disappointed. In today’s world, it is imperative that we are advocates for our own health.

Coming Soon: Miami ReLife’s Dr. Steven Gelbard

The first series is with Dr. Steven Gelbard, a nationally-famed authority with his ReLife Miami Institute on stem cells. Dr. Gelbard presents D’OXYVA’s Nobel Prize-winning science as a regenerative medicine. Dr. Gelbard is involving his direct contacts with top NFL players and other top sports celebrities in the monthly series, along with 25—40 top neurosurgeons and other experts working under ReLife.

Imagine having the ability to receive D’OXYVA and other innovative treatments and non-invasive procedures for chronic wound care amid the luxury of a five-star hotel. Behind The Scenes guest, Dr. Gelbard, a Tufts School of Medicine educated neurosurgeon, makes it happen right now. Medicine has left the hospital building and has become the proactive choice of the health conscious. We can all look forward to learning more about how to live a healthier and more informed lifestyle from this awe-inspiring episode.

According to Norbert Kiss, President and CEO of Circularity Healthcare, this collaboration is door busting. Mr. Kiss tells us, ”[We] can offer unprecedented access to this amazing Emmy-winning show called Behind the Scenes with very competitive terms due to our strategic involvement. We welcome any expert.”

Laurence Fishburne, host of Behind The Scenes,” beckons, “Join me as we all discover the endless ways to enjoy the skills and imagination.”

Don’t miss the evolution. It’s being televised. Circularity and Behind The Scenes—Stay tuned for a mind-fortifying experience!

Circularity Values:

We, at Circularity believe in a long-sought-after goal in health care; people should have access to one health application that solves most of their short and long term health issues without compromising other aspects of their health while doing this quickly, affordably, and without pain. Circularity develops, manufactures and markets advanced technologies that significantly improve quality of life by improving some of the most essential physiological functions in the body.

About Behind The Scenes With Laurence Fishburne

Behind The Scenes is an award-winning program that highlights new stories and innovative concepts through groundbreaking short-form and long-form documentary presentation. The program, which is anchored by a veteran production team with decades of industry experience, is able to effectively communicate the most critical stories to a wide and diverse audience.

Behind The Scenes with Laurence Fishburne, has established an impressive and heralded career, amassing over one-hundred credits across the varied platforms of stage, television and film. He’s well known for major for roles in such films as; John Wick 2, Fantastic 4 Rise of the Silver Surfer, Mission Impossible III, Mystic River, Boyz n the Hood, What’s Love Got to Do With It, and Apocalypse Now. On the small screen, the award-winning and versatile actor played compelling roles in shows such as CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, CSI: Miami, CSI: New York and Hannibal. The Behind The Scenes Actor currently stars as Pops on the hit TV comedy Black-ish.

About Circularity Healthcare, LLC

Circularity Healthcare, LLC, located in Los Angeles, CA is a private biotech and medtech products and services company that designs, makes, markets, sells, distributes and licenses its own patented and patent pending technologies, such as its flagship non-invasive deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator product line, D’OXYVA®. One of the main mechanisms underlying D’OXYVA’s science received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2019. Circularity enters into exclusive agreements with manufacturers to launch products and with large and small clinics and hospitals in order to help them enhance their profits and credit profiles with a wide variety of advanced products and services. In addition, Circularity Healthcare assists in the financing of equipment, working capital and also patient financing at industry-leading terms and speed.

Posted on Leave a comment

What You Need to Know About Non-Healing Wounds

Chronic wounds are wounds that do not heal in a normal amount of time. This delay in healing can be due to a number of factors. Read on to learn about the case of a 63-year-old female patient with a large chronic wound on her lower, left extremity that was resistant to healing.

Lena was a 63-year-old, White female who had developed a large, non-healing wound on her lower, right leg. She could not remember what had caused the lesion other than having dropped a heavy mirror on her right shin several weeks earlier. Lena had a past medical history of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart failure, liver failure, and blood clots in her legs. She had been a cigarette smoker for the last 50 years.

Lena’s physical examination showed a large, deep, non-healing wound on her right shin. Surgical treatment and debridement, along with antibiotic treatment, had failed to result in significant treatment. After 8 weeks of adjunctive application with deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator D’OXYVA[1], the chronic wound improved without any further complications.

Main Reasons Chronic Wounds Do Not Heal

Chronic wounds normally do not heal for a number of reasons, including[2]:

  • Increased age of the patient leading to slower healing time
  • Decreased functioning of the immune system due to illnesses or chronic disease processes
  • Decreased circulation due to diabetes affecting the peripheral vascular system
  • Decreased circulation due to peripheral vascular disease
  • Peripheral neuropathy leading to loss of sensation and the inability to feel wound and ulcer formation
  • Insufficiency of the venous system leading to pooling of blood in the extremities and resultant poor perfusion
  • Poor nutrition leading to decreased ability to heal wounds normally
  • Impaired mobility leading to impaired limb perfusion
  • Increased general stress levels leading to decreased wound healing
  • Decreased general health causing general debilitation and loss of normal healing ability

Variations of Chronic Wounds

There are several different variations of chronic wounds, including pressure ulcers, arterial and venous ulcers, and diabetic ulcers.

Pressure ulcers[3], such as “bed sores,” occur when an area of the skin is under constant pressure, often when a patient is confined to a bed or wheelchair.

This causes the skin to break down in areas such as the coccyx, heel, ankles, and dorsum of the foot.

Arterial ulcers[4] form when there is a blockage in an artery causing reduction in blood flow to the lower extremities and subsequent reduction in the supply of oxygen to the affected area.

Venous ulcers[5] occur when the valves within veins become damaged leading to pooling of blood in the veins and reduced blow flow and oxygenation to the extremities.

Diabetic ulcers occur when high blood sugar levels cause damage to the nerves, especially in the lower extremities.

This leads to numbness, causing the patient to ignore cuts or ulcers until they enlarge, often becoming infected.

Diabetes also depresses the immune system, leading to slowed healing.

Treatments for Chronic Non-Healing Wounds

There are a number of treatments for non-healing wounds [7]. These include:

  • Antibiotics to treat bacterial infections
  • Antifungals to treat fungal infections
  • Hyperbaric oxygen treatments to improve chronic wound healing
  • Surgical debridement to remove necrotic tissue
  • Specialty wrapping of chronic wounds
  • Skin grafting to close chronic wounds
  • D’OXYVA[8]skin delivery deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator as a wound solution to improve blood flow and oxygenation to chronic wound areas

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) provides advanced, painless, complete and fast wound care solution. It has demonstrated speeding up diabetic wound improvement to an average of 5 weeks**.

In addition, D’OXYVA  improved quality of life such as sleep, appetite and mood in just a week in 100% of subjects. No adverse events of any kind were reported during, and years after the studies.

Posted on Leave a comment

Circularity Healthcare Negotiating $100 million Institutional Funding, Expands Successful D’OXYVA Phase 3 Diabetic Foot Ulcer Treatment Clinical Trials, Expects Fast-Track FDA Approval

Read Article in PRWeb

[Los Angeles, CA, July 16, 2019] Circularity Healthcare LLC, developer and manufacturer of transdermal drug delivery and wound healing products, has announced that the company has entered into negotiations with institutional investors to inject up to $100 million in growth capital into the company. The capital is to be used to drive Circularity’s launch of product sales in collaboration with several global multinational partners, with a target of several hundred million dollars. The company’s overarching fundraising goal is to access public equity markets through a multibillion-dollar U.S. IPO in the near future.

Privately-held, Los Angeles-based Circularity Healthcare is capitalizing on its completed successful and expanded Phase 3 clinical studies led by prominent researchers, such as Prof. David Armstrong, Prof. Ito Puruhito and Dr. Felix Sigal, and leading institutions, such as MIT, Airlangga, Harvard, Yale, University of Texas at Arlington, and many others. The clinical studies are expected to lead to the company’s highly anticipated Food and Drug Administration FDA approval as a non-significant risk (NSR) combination drug-device for the rapid and highly effective treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

These exciting developments come on the heels of the rapidly growing market demand for Circularity’s existing product line with a proven technology, manufacturing and fulfillment base. Circularity has recently begun production of its unique, branded, pharmaceutical-grade platform drug molecules.

Already well positioned as an emerging global biotech and medtech product manufacturer, Circularity is now shifting more focus from its non-regulated wellness and cosmetic products to its premium FDA-approved patented and patent-pending drug solutions. These solutions are delivered with the company’s patented and patent pending, non-invasive and painless, rapid transdermal drug delivery systems. The expanded focus is due to Circularity’s exceptionally positive Phase 3 multicenter, multicountry, and multiyear human clinical trials on diabetic foot ulcers, as well as its overall regulatory development path.

Recently, the company launched sales of MicroScan, a clinical diagnostics tool with an installed base at intensive care units (ICU) in 35 countries worldwide. MicroScan enables Circularity to generate much higher average revenue per customer, while providing highly affordable insights, both for patients and health professionals, into the inner workings and mechanisms of actions underpinning the exceptional clinical outcomes of Circularity’s flagship D’OXYVA product line. Until recently, D’OXYVA was available only under test-marketing programs. Together with the diagnostic tools, health experts implementing D’OXYVA can accurately predict wound healing and other major clinical outcomes, such as achieving healthy blood sugar or blood pressure.

Once D’OXYVA has helped the patient achieve healthy levels in such key areas, physicians typically recommend a less frequent dosing schedule in order to remain symptom-free long-term.

During the past seven years, Circularity has assembled a world-class clinical research, regulatory and legal team comprised of several dozen experts mainly from the U.S. and from several influential European and Asian countries for its comprehensive global market development.

Posted on Leave a comment

3 Reasons Why Most Wounds Won’t Heal

There are several connected causes of non-healing wounds. According to figures from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chronic wounds–injuries that have yet to heal after six weeks–affect some 5.7 American adults. There are many reasons for these non-healing wounds, and understanding each cause is vital to implementing the most effective wound care regimen possible.

Here are three of the more frequent explanations for why many wounds just won’t heal:

 

As Johns Hopkins Medical School pointed out, blood is perhaps the most important component of the entire wound healing process. When an injury occurs, it’s the blood that transports cells to the wound site, which begin rebuilding veins and other important tissue structures. When you have poor circulation, blood cannot move around as quickly, and as a result, wounds take much longer to begin healing. According to Healthline, there are several medical conditions that cause poor circulation, including varicose veins, obesity and chronic ailments like diabetes, peripheral artery disease and Raynaud’s disease. Fortunately, there are just as many ways to improve circulation, like frequent exercise and elevating wounds or limbs in general.

According to the Mayo Clinic, edema occurs when fluid leaks from blood vessels, causing these secretions to accumulate in nearby tissue. The result is a large bump or nodule that is painful and sometimes prone to infection. Edema is usually the result of a number of medications, including several drug therapies geared toward diabetes. Edema can also occur due to a reaction to steroids, anti-inflammatory drugs and even estrogen supplements. Other than being uncomfortable, edema can wreak havoc on the wound-healing process. Due to fluid buildup, the blood vessels and tissue become rigid and immovable, greatly restricting blood flow. This compression cycle can also kill skin patches, which could lead to ulcers.

As a rule, infections can be quite traumatic to the host. Perhaps the biggest effect–one that might surprise some people–is that infections can all but halt the wound healing process. According to St. Luke’s Clinic, an average infection has a number of methods for preventing healthy tissue regeneration. For instance, some infections can extend the length of the inflammatory phase, and that can halt the subsequent stages of wound healing. Additionally, there are strains that can interfere with clotting mechanisms, which in turn causes wounds to continue bleeding. According to a 2010 study from the Journal of Dental Research, the two most damaging strains of bacteria are pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococcus.

When it comes to handling chronic wounds, patients need advanced wound care products to prevent infection and create a sustainable healing environment; that’s why so many patients turn to Advanced Tissue when they experience most chronic wounds. As the nation’s leader in the delivery of specialized wound care supplies, Advanced Tissue ships supplies to individuals at home and in long-term care facilities.

 

Ref: https://advancedtissue.com/2016/02/3-reasons-why-most-wounds-wont-heal/

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

Clinical studies with D’OXYVA®  (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) have shown extraordinary results for the role of transdermal noninvasive wound care using ultra-purified, nontoxic, FDA-cleared molecules, such as CO2especially when all other approaches failed.

In an ongoing multiyear, multi-country, multicenter, randomized clinical trial on patients with diabetic foot ulcers, D’OXYVA has demonstrated speeding up diabetic wound healing and ultimately wound closure to an average of 5 weeks**.

Posted on Leave a comment

Anesthesia, Microcirculation, and Wound Repair in Aging

Abstract

Age-related changes in skin contribute to poor wound healing after surgical procedures. Changes in skin with age include a decline in thickness and composition, a decrease in the number of most cell types, and diminished microcirculation, the process that provides tissue perfusion, fluid homeostasis, and delivery of oxygen and other nutrients. It also controls temperature and the inflammatory response. Surgical incisions cause further disruption of the microvasculature of aged skin; however, perioperative management can be modified to minimize damage to aged tissues. Judicious use of fluids, maintenance of normal body temperature, pain control, and increased tissue oxygen tension are examples of adjustable variables that support microcirculation. Anesthetic agents influence microcirculation in a number of ways, including cardiac output, arterial pressure, and local microvascular changes. The authors examined the role of anesthetic management in optimizing microcirculation and potentially improving postoperative wound repair in older persons.

Aged skin is at increased risk of poor postoperative wound healing. Changes in the cutaneous microcirculation with aging contribute to this risk. This review examines the role of anesthesia management in microcirculatory function.

SURGICAL wound repair is a major problem in the older population, who are at increased risk of wound dehiscence and infection. As a specific example, surgical site infections (SSIs) are common (approximately 500,000 cases annually in the United States), lead to worse patient outcome (patients who develop SSI are twice as likely to die), and are an enormous economic burden (1–10 billion dollars annually). Many factors contribute to age-related changes in skin5 and subsequent vulnerability to impaired wound healing and infection. Changes in skin with age (fig. 1) include a decline in epidermal and dermal thickness and composition, as well as a decrease in the number of most resident cell types. The dermal–epidermal junction is flattened and the microcirculation is diminished. The latter is defined as blood flow through arterioles, capillaries, and venules and is the key system that affects the entire skin surface. In the aging patient, the microcirculation in the skin is reduced by 40% between the ages of 20 and 70 yr. The microcirculation provides tissue perfusion, fluid hemostasis, and delivery of oxygen and other nutrients. It also controls temperature and the inflammatory response. Surgical incisions cause disruption of the microcirculation in the skin as manifested by local edema resulting from vasodilation and increased vascular permeability.

Fig. 1.
Numerous changes in skin with age contribute to impaired wound healing.
art1.png

 

Perioperative management can be modified to optimize the microcirculation. Measures that support the microcirculation include careful use of fluids, normothermia, pain control, and smoking cessation. Factors that can be influenced by intraoperative management (judicious use of fluids, maintenance of normal body temperature, pain control, and increased tissue oxygen tension) have been suggested to be beneficial as well. Most anesthetic agents also influence the microcirculation: a reduction in cardiac output and arterial pressure decreases flow in the microcirculation, whereas anesthetic-induced local microvascular changes and vasodilatation can increase perfusion. Optimization of these variables plays an important role in enhancing the microcirculation in all patients, but is especially relevant if modifications could improve postoperative wound healing in the older population.

In this review, we will use skin as a representative organ to describe age-related changes that negatively affect the microcirculation and have subsequent impacts on wound healing and the incidence of postoperative infection. We will then examine the role of anesthesia management in minimizing detrimental effects on the microcirculation. A greater understanding of these variables could promote improvements that lead to better outcomes with respect to wound repair in older patients.

Summary of Wound Repair and Aging

It has been nearly a century since it was noted that the rate of cutaneous scar formation after a wound is inversely related to the age of the patient. Four decades ago, it was observed that older age was associated with an increased risk of postoperative disruption of the surgical wound, leading to higher mortality. Recent data suggest that in patients older than 65 yr, development of SSI is associated with a two-fold increase in cost and a staggering four-fold increase in mortality.

Wound healing ensues via a sequential chain of events (with variable overlap) that includes inflammation, tissue formation, and remodeling (fig. 2). Circulating factors have a pivotal role in each of these phases. Accordingly, as we will discuss below, immediate changes in the microcirculation influence each stages of the wound-healing response in aging. As human data is lacking, we have taken data from established animal models of aging. Although animal models are not uniformly predictive of responses in human tissues, several animal models of wound healing are generally accepted.

Fig. 2.

The stages of wound healing are a sequential chain of events that include: (A) inflammation, (B) proliferation and granulation tissue formation, and (C) extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and tissue remodeling. PDGF = platelet-derived growth factor; TGF-β1 = transforming growth factor-β1; TNF-α = tumor necrosis factor-α; VEGF = vascular endothelial growth factor.

art2.png

Summary

Nearly every anesthesiologist who provides care to adults will participate in the care of geriatric patients. A growing older population is undergoing surgical procedures that are increasing in number and complexity. Poor healing of surgical wounds is a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and substantial economic burden. Wound healing is dependent on the microcirculation that supplies the incision area. Measures that support the microcirculation during the perioperative period have a profound effect on wound healing. Some measures such as maintenance of normal body temperature and control of postoperative pain are supported by ample evidence and have been implemented in routine clinical care. Other measures, for example, the choice of anesthesia technique and use of opioids are supported by basic research but need further clinical studies. A better understanding of the effect of aging and anesthesia on the microcirculation can potentially assist in improving postoperative wound repair, thereby benefiting a growing older population.

The Surgical Context of Wound Repair and Aging

Measures that support the microcirculation improve wound repair, thereby reducing the risk of postoperative dehiscence and infection.52General preoperative measures such as smoking cessation and optimal management of comorbid medical conditions have been reviewed in other contexts.53,54 For the purpose of this review, we will focus on interventions in the perioperative setting.

Oxygen Administration

Wound healing is dependent upon adequate levels of oxygen.55 Oxygen interacts with growth factor signaling and regulates numerous transduction pathways necessary for cell proliferation and migration.56 It is also an indispensable factor for oxidative killing of microbes.57 Consequently, the effects of oxygen tension on the outcome of surgical wounds have been best studied in the context of postoperative infection. Resistance to surgical wound infection is presumed to be oxygen dependent—with low oxygen tension viewed as a predictor of the development of infection,56 particularly when subcutaneous tissue oxygenation (measured by a polarographic electrode) decreases to less than 40 mmHg.58

In two recent meta-analyses, one found that perioperative supplemental oxygen therapy exerts a significant beneficial effect on the prevention of SSIs,59 whereas the other suggested a benefit only for specific subpopulations.60 Although most authors suggest that supplemental oxygen during surgery is associated with a reduction in infection risk,61,62 others propose it may be associated with an increased incidence of postoperative wound infection.63Notably, in the latter report, the sample size was small and there was a difference in the baseline characteristics of the groups. A prospective trial randomizing patients to either 30 or 80% supplemental oxygen during and 2 h after surgery did not find any difference in several outcome measures including death, pulmonary complications, and wound healing.64 Of note, the administration of oxygen to aged subjects may be limited by the finding that although arterial oxygen tension did not decrease with age, there was reduced steady-state transfer of carbon monoxide in the lungs.65 This indicates that oxygen transport could be diffusion-limited in older subjects, especially when oxygen consumption is increased. Furthermore, longitudinal studies of five healthy men over 3 decades showed impaired efficiency of maximal peripheral oxygen extraction,66 suggesting that tissue oxygen uptake is reduced in the aged subjects.67 This likely reflects a decrease in the number of capillaries as well as a reduction in mitochondrial enzyme activity.68 Animal models (rabbit69 and mouse69,70 ) have suggested that aging and ischemia have an additive effect on disruption of wound healing. Consequently, the potential benefit of increasing tissue oxygen tension during surgical wound repair in older patients should be further evaluated.

Reference: http://anesthesiology.pubs.asahq.org/article.aspx?articleid=1917910